Aladdin Full Movie

Aladdin Full Movie : Aladdin Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And others Disney rolled out the purple carpet Tuesday night for a lavish Hollywood premiere celebrating director Guy Ritchie’s live-action remake of the beloved 1992 animated film, which arrives in theaters Friday.

After the teaser and the “special look” preview – which premiered Will Smith’s, erm, interesting-looking Genie – we now have our first full look at Guy Ritchie’s take on Disney’s animated classic, Aladdin.

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Revealed by Smith himself, the new trailer showcases much more of the film’s plot and rich visuals – both of which look like they are sticking pretty closely to the original ‘toon – as well as new versions of classic songs Friend Like Me and A Whole New World. The biggest reveal, though, is that it looks like (thankfully) we’ll be seeing as much if not more of Will Smith in regular human form than his CG-enhanced blue body.

You can watch the trailer below…Just like the 1992 original, the film follows the fortunes of the titular hero (played by Mena Massoud), a good-hearted Agrabahian street urchin who sets out on a mission to win the heart of the Sultan’s daughter, Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott), and stop the dastardly sorcerer Jafar (Marwan Kenzari) from overthrowing the Sultan (Navid Negahban). As before, he’s aided in his quest by his pet monkey Abu, a flying magic carpet and Smith’s wise-cracking Genie.

Disney has had huge success in recent years with live-action remakes of its own animated back catalogue: Bill Condon’s Beauty And The Beast and Tim Burton’s Alice In Wonderland both took over $1 billion at the worldwide box office, while Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book fell just shy of that landmark.

And with Ritchie’s Aladdin being sandwiched between Burton’s Dumbo (out 29 March) and Favreau’s The Lion King (19 July) “reimaginings”, the Mouse House looks like it could be in for a bumper year – unless, of course, remake fatigue sets in…

Aladdin opens in UK cinemas on 24 May 2019.Stuck with your apps and games giving you the Google Play Download Pending status with no real progress? Here’s how you can get rid of the limitless wait time and get your favorite Android apps installed right away.

More than a decade of using smartphones can make you forget of the primitive time when Nokia was the rage. We were limited to the OVI App Store where the options were slim for the Symbian OS and there wasn’t a real market for app development. However, the true era of smartphones was ushered in by Android OS under the wing of Google. But it wasn’t until the release of the Google Play Store that changed the face of the mobile software platform as we know it.

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Over the years the support of thousands of mainstream and independent app developers have created a virtual ecosystem. This ecosystem of apps and games on the Google Play Store has reshaped the way we use our mobile devices. However, the system is far from being perfect, with the Google Play Download Pending status not being the only issue users face on the regular basis.It’s understandable if it took people a while to come around to the idea of a live-action adaptation of Disney’s Aladdin directed by Guy Ritchie. The Howard Ashman and Alan Menken musical numbers in 1992’s Aladdin are iconic. They seem even more so after the death of the film’s original Genie, Robin Williams, who brought a memorable, highly personal performance style to “Prince Ali” and “Friend Like Me.” So the idea that Ritchie — who specializes in fast-paced crime dramedies, and has never directed a musical — was going to come in and grasp the nuances of staging songs in a way worthy of the original vision was questionable at best.

But when you strip all the music away, Aladdin is at its heart a film about two men, a heist, and a big con — one of Ritchie’s favorite dynamics. Viewed through a certain lens, Aladdin is about a poor orphan (Mena Massoud) and the sultan’s evil vizier Jafar (Marwan Kenzari, who lacks any of Jafar’s necessary sense of menace) chasing down a valuable lamp from a mysterious location, then spending the rest of the movie trying to get it back from each other. Meanwhile, they both angle to get the girl (Princess Jasmine, played by Naomi Scott) through a series of elaborate lies. All of which feels squarely within the wheelhouse Ritchie has lived in through a career of fast-moving crime films like Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, and equally fast-moving adventures like Sherlock Holmes and The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

Problem is, when you strip the music and animation away, there’s not much left for Will Smith and his merry band of Hollywood newcomers to work with. Aladdin does add one quick personal scene between Aladdin and Jafar, which gives Jafar a tinge more backstory and purpose, and suggests a meaningful connection between the characters. But that angle is quickly dropped. The filmmakers aren’t much interested in developing these characters out of their original two dimensions, or leaning into the character dynamics that make Ritchie movies distinctive. As a result, the whole endeavor feels unfinished and unresolved.

Echo in the Canyon Full Movie

Echo in the Canyon Full Movie : Echo in the Canyon Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And others Echo In The Canyon celebrates the explosion of popular music that came out of Dylan, the film explores the beginnings of the Laurel Canyon music scene.Music legends crafted immortal sounds in Laurel Canyon.Echo In The Canyon celebrates the explosion of popular music that came out of LA’s Laurel Canyon in the mid-60s as folk went electric and The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield and The Mamas and the Papas gave birth to the California Sound.

There are probably four or five documentaries’ worth of material to pull from the Laurel Canyon music scene and the cultural movements of late 1960s Los Angeles, but even if “Echo in the Canyon” feels slightly anemic at 85 minutes or so, there are worse ways to revisit this epochal artistic moment than via Andrew Slater’s affectionate, intimate documentary.

Though Wallflowers frontman Jakob Dylan is not an especially warm or generous interviewer, anecdotes and observations from musical luminaries past and present help paint a vivid portrait of the impact of that time and place upon the sound of popular music and the industry as a whole.

Combining reminiscences from the likes of Stephen Stills, Brian Wilson, Eric Clapton and the late Tom Petty with insights, opinions, and eventually, performances from contemporary figures such as Cat Power, Beck and Fiona Apple, “Echo in the Canyon” offers a halcyon survey of the major players of the Laurel Canyon music scene, along with the feverish creativity that produced some of the best and most adventurous music of the time.

Framed by footage from Jacques Demy’s 1969 movie “Model Shop,” which the filmmakers suggest embodies the look and feel of the era, Dylan and former Capitol Records president Slater dive into those fertile years where singers and songwriters nestled into the Hollywood Hills to create fantastic music in a communal environment.

What’s immediately evident from the stories told by Petty, Roger McGuinn and others is the reflexive and inspirational nature of that community; after the Beatles recorded “Rubber Soul,” inspiration struck Wilson to create the Beach Boys’ “Pet Sounds,” which in turn influenced “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” and so on. These were people with a strong sense of musicianship, who identified influences, absorbed them into their own work as it formed, and then produced something that occasionally echoed the work of their predecessors. Ultimately, it pushed forward the whole folk-rock-into-rock genre as a whole.

Unlike many rose-colored journeys down music’s memory lane, there’s a surprising amount of corroboration between the various stories told about an era where people were experimenting with mind-altering substances. And while libertine behavior has over the years occasionally been revised or erased to make the participants involved seem more appealing, here, Michelle Phillips talks openly and unapologetically about her affairs, for example.

The Lovin’ Spoonful frontman John Sebastian confirms the time McGuinn, after picking up folk-music chord changes in the Beatles’ “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” went down New York’s Playhouse Café and performed the song to considerable criticism and derision. Petty describes the happenstance of George Harrison receiving the second Rickenbacker 12-string guitar instead of John Lennon, for whom it was meant, and using it to steal riffs from The Byrds’ “The Bells of Rhymney” for “If I Ever Needed Someone.”

This respectful collaborative environment produced some of the most enduring and influential music ever recorded. When Beck and Apple and mesmerizing former Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros member Jade Castrinos perform at a 2015 concert, those songs from that era mostly sound as vivid and evocative today as they did then. But the cumulative effect feels slightly more like a long-form promotional vehicle for Dylan’s companion album, also entitled “Echo in the Canyon,” than a proper chronicle of the musical movement that inspired it.

Meanwhile, Dylan has an impenetrability on camera, sitting stoically as David Crosby recounts the time Stephen Stills dove out a window to avoid getting nabbed by cops responding to a noise complaint, that leaves his contributions largely inert. Thankfully, when you have old-school hippie musicians waxing poetic about their foibles, there isn’t much need for active interviewing, but it feels like Crosby’s overdue, candid observations about his culpability in being kicked out of the Byrds should be met with more than low-key acceptance.
Still, the juxtaposition of folks like Beck and Regina Spektor offering insights about why that music resonates, alongside stories about how it was originally made, is consistently some fascinating stuff.

Slater’s access feels somewhat unprecedented both in terms of the number of interviewees and their willingness to be completely open. He taps into some great threads about the overlapping creativity of these bands and, crucially, the musicianship that enabled them to receive the torch passed by somebody with the magnitude of talent of the Beatles or the Mamas and the Papas and just run with it. But at less than 90 minutes, no particular narrative spine ever clearly emerges, leaving these revelations floating in a warm and welcoming lazy river of remembrance.

Mind you, there are worse things than hanging out with and listening to a whos-who of 1960s musical icons reflecting on the motivations, mechanics and mischief involved in creating some of their most famous songs. But given the seemingly unlimited volume of talent on screen and available to the filmmakers, “Echo in the Canyon” slightly wastes an opportunity to showcase the multigenerational reverberations of that movement because it never settles on a strong voice and specific vision to tie together their recollections into a cohesive story.

GRAMMY winner Jakob Dylan may have come of age in the ’80s, but, per his paradigmatic namesake, he’s quite in touch with the generations of musicians that came before him.

The Tomorrow Man Full Movie

The Tomorrow Man Full Movie :The Tomorrow Man Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And others“.The Tomorrow Man,” two lonely people “on the wrong side of 60” experience. Part of the movie’s understated humor is that due to Ed’s prepper outlook,John Lithgow and Blythe Danner in “The Tomorrow Man. Sometimes you’d think there was a conspiracy among movie stylists to turn older to look quirky; instead, she just looks like she doesn’t own a full-length mirror.

Sometimes you’d think there was a conspiracy among movie stylists to turn older female characters into a combination of sister-wife and refugee from a Laura Ashley sample sale. As Ronnie in the late-life romance “The Tomorrow Man,” the lovely Blythe Danner is their latest victim. Swathed in mismatched separates, shapeless woolens and schoolgirl ankle socks, Ronnie is supposed to look quirky; instead, she just looks like she doesn’t own a full-length mirror.

Written and directed by Noble Jones, “The Tomorrow Man” is a cloying, at times disturbing tale of two dotty seniors whose eccentricities unexpectedly mesh. Ronnie’s issues, though — she’s a timid hoarder who likes war documentaries — are mild compared to the aggressively paranoid lens through which Ed (John Lithgow) views the world. An apocalypse-obsessed retiree whose time is spent stocking his fallout shelter and communing online with fellow doom-and-gloom survivalists, Ed stalks Ronnie at the supermarket until she agrees to have coffee with him.
Ignoring the fact that Ed should scare, rather than charm, most women like Ronnie, “The Tomorrow Man” wends its whimsical way toward love, using physical objects as metaphors for psychological baggage. There is a market for this kind of low-key pablum — especially with such fine leads — where characters are little more than bundles of idiosyncrasies. Yet it’s precisely because Lithgow is so good that Ed’s alarming mental problems resist the movie’s pressure to turn them into comic relief.
A doomsday prepper and a hoarder walk into a grocery store and therein lies the meet-cute of Noble Jones’ debut feature, “The Tomorrow Man,” an odd little romantic dramedy starring John Lithgow and Blythe Danner.

The film starts with a promising premise, and Jones carefully lays out the mannered details of his main character. Lithgow plays Ed, who meticulousy buys canned goods, batteries and gas every day and stashes it in a secret bunker. He thinks the local news anchor is speaking directly to him and posts daily on conspiracy theory message boards. But when he meets — or rather, stalks — Ronnie (Danner) in his local grocery store, his obsessive tendencies have a new object of attention and affection, who he is convinced is of like mind. She also grocery shops a lot and has a penchant for war documentaries.

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“The Tomorrow Man” is a story about two very lonely people connecting — if they can only get over their own baggage, which is represented quite literally in the useless stuff they’ve accumulated in their homes. Jones, who also shot the film, is making the switch to writing and directing after a career as a cinematographer and music video director. His voice and point of view are unique, but after that promising setup, the film meanders, trying and failing to find some sense of purpose with these two oddball characters and their rich backstories. But Ronnie and Ed just listlessly bounce off each other, trying to make their relationship work despite their issues.
In other films, Danner and Lithgow would each be the quirky half of a couple playing off a straight man, so casting the two together leads to wonderful moments between the veteran actors, stepping outside their comfort zone into something a little more offbeat. One thing’s for certain: Blythe Danner is pure magic. The actress can make any material sing with her singular choices and sheer charisma.

There’s a vaguely sci-fi bent to “The Tomorrow Man,” but it’s less about the apocalypse itself and more about the fear of death, which is coming for us all, in sickness or in mushroom cloud. It takes a roundabout route to get to this overall message, and while Jones’ film gets a bit lost along the way, the film is nevertheless a distinctive debut of feature writing and directing.
If there’s one thing we’ve learned from movies and TV in recent years, it’s this: There is no age limit to falling in love.

A romantic subgenre has developed over the last few years in which older people fall in love — often to their own surprise — including the 2015 hit indie “I’ll See You in My Dreams” with Blythe Danner and Sam Elliott and the Jane Fonda-Lily Tomlin Netflix comedy “Grace and Frankie.”

Now, Tony and Emmy winners Danner and John Lithgow are struck by Cupid’s arrow in the quirky independent comedy-drama “The Tomorrow Man.”

In “The Tomorrow Man,” the first feature film from music video director Noble Jones, Lithgow plays a divorced retiree with a grown son who spends a lot of his time watching Fox News-style TV and preparing for the end of the world. Danner’s Ronnie is a sweet widower who works in a knick-knack store and has been a hoarder since her infant daughter died years before.

“These are two people who really need somebody else to come into their lives and break them of this cycle,” Lithgow, who is currently on Broadway in “Hillary and Clinton,” said in a recent phone interview. “And that’s what happens. That’s what the movie’s about — two people who really change each other and move each other.”

In a separate phone interview, Danner noted that one of the main attractions of doing the film was to play people “who were so different from what we had ever played.”

“After these long years of working,” she said, “it’s such a gift to be able to do things that I haven’t done before.”

For decades, Danner, 76, and Lithgow, 73, have been trying to work together. They nearly did in 1980, when Lithgow was asked to appear opposite her in the Broadway production of Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal.”

“Very stupidly, I turned it down because I had a committed to do a friend’s play off-Broadway,” Lithgow said. “My friend’s play was a huge flop. I won’t even tell you the name. I was so tormented by my mistake.”

Brightburn Full Movie

Brightburn Full Movie : Brightburn Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And othersA high-school movie is done right when the moments and characters in the story are so authentic and genuine that the young people watching feel as if their lives were somehow put on film.

Sometimes your bedrock assumptions about the world and your place in it suddenly collapse, a kind of existential earthquake that makes you rethink everything. For Molly, a Los Angeles teenager, that happens on the last day of senior year, in the school bathroom.

It’s no exaggeration — and not really much of a judgment — to say that Molly (Beanie Feldstein) thinks she’s better than everyone else, with the crucial exception of her best friend, Amy (Kaitlyn Dever). Valedictorian and student body president, on her way to Yale and then, she’s certain, to a seat on the Supreme Court, Molly has played the meritocratic game to win. Her morning meditation instructs her to “dominate the day,” and while her peers have been goofing off and hanging out, she and Amy have been hitting the books and building their résumés.

Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever in Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut, “Booksmart.”
Credit
Annapurna Pictures

ImageIt seems that we are living in a golden age of female-led coming-of-age comedies. Lady Bird and The Edge Of Seventeen announced their directors as filmmakers to watch, while Blockers put the lie to the idea that it’s impossible to be both sensitive to changing social mores and laugh-out-loud funny at the same time. Annapurna’s new comedy Booksmart accomplishes both of these feats, launching a new chapter in director Olivia Wilde’s career while redefining the “one crazy night” teen movie for Generation Z. The film is predicated on upending stereotypes about both popular and unpopular high school kids, and makes a point of establishing sympathy with even its most cartoonish characters. But this isn’t a group therapy session: Sex, drugs, booze, mean girls, and earth-shattering betrayals all still come into the equation. It’s just that in 2019, the kids running off into the suburban night trying to avoid getting busted for underage drinking self-identify as intersectional feminists.

Booksmart also does an excellent job of depicting the weird, intense bonds that form between unpopular teenage girls—in this case, honor roll students Amy (Kaitlyn Dever) and Molly (Beanie Feldstein). Amy and Molly have spent their teen years sucking up to their teachers, making feminist protest art—a sign on the door to Amy’s room reads, “A Room Of One’s Own”—and watching Ken Burns documentaries together. The most rebellious thing they’ve ever done is sneak into the UCLA library after hours. Outspoken RBG wannabe Molly already has Amy’s and her entire life trajectories planned out, a dynamic that the shy, passive Amy seems to enjoy, or at least accept.

But then Molly, in typical overachiever fashion, declares that she and Amy are going to cram four years’ worth of partying into one night. This is after Molly finds out that some less driven classmates also got into good colleges, even though they’ve wasted their youths crushing beer cans against their thick skulls. (At least, this is how Molly sees it.) Humiliated by the concept, Molly insists that she and Amy need at least one wild story to take with them to college so no one knows what losers they were in high school. So over Amy’s objections, the two don matching jumpsuits, lie to Amy’s indulgent parents about where they’re going, and head out to the biggest graduation party in town. The problem is that they don’t have the address, and no one is texting them back.

It’s thus uniquely humiliating when Molly learns, in the bathroom, that a bunch of kids she’s taken for losers — stoners, skaters, sexpots, slackers — are also going to top schools. If everyone’s a winner, Molly’s whole identity is a sham.This revelation sets off the festival of furious, belated YOLO-ing that drives most of “Booksmart,” a fast, brainy, nasty-but-nice teenage comedy directed by Olivia Wilde. Molly and Amy, who is about to leave for a summer do-gooding program in Botswana before matriculating at Columbia, have one night left to cut loose, and the movie rides in their wake as they bounce through Los Angeles in search of the party that will be wild enough to make up for all the time they’ve wasted playing by the rules.

The Proposal Full Movie

The Proposal Full Movie : The Proposal Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And others, A pushy boss forces her young assistant to marry her in order to keep her visa status in the U.S. and avoid deportation to Canada..A movie with two great stars and a fantastic array huge stars as their supporting cast (including, Mary Steenburgen, Craig T. Nelson, Betty White, Denis O’Hare …

Executives at four major publishing houses said they had shot down a proposed memoir by Woody Allen that had shopped late last year, the New York Times reported on Thursday.

The publishing executives, none of whom were named by the Times, all said they decided not to make an offer for the book, citing the marketing challenges in the #MeToo era. Some publishers declined to even read the submitted manuscript, the paper said, while noting it is possible that an unidentified publisher may be moving forward with publication without a public announcement.

Several executives described the Oscar-winning filmmaker as “toxic” to the Times since the resurfacing of old accusations that Allen inappropriately touched Dylan Farrow, his then-7-year-old daughter with ex-girlfriend Mia Farrow. (Investigators found no evidence of abuse, and Allen has repeatedly denied the accusations.)

“The Proposal,” Jill Magid’s captivatingly wily documentary about her attempt to liberate the archives of the renowned Mexican architect Luis Barragán, wears many faces. Detailing at once an art project and a rescue mission, a love triangle and an elaborate, outlandish bargain, the movie has a surface serenity that belies its fuming emotions.

In this, it mirrors the three-year correspondence between Magid (a writer and artist who once trained as a spy), and the controller of the archives, Federica Zanco. Rumored to have acquired them in the mid-1990s as an engagement gift from her fiancé, the owner of a Swiss design conglomerate, Zanco rigidly guards them from all but limited public access in her foundation near Basel. Faced with major obstacles to mounting her own exhibition on Barragán (who died in 1988), Magid embarks on an epistolary seduction of increasing flattery and desperationAs Magid putters around Barragán’s Mexico City studio, researching and plotting and painting her toenails, her voice-over pleas to Zanco — and the creamily polite rebuffs — turn the movie into a delicate duel between two women armed with obsessions for the same man. They will finally meet in a Swiss cafe, filmed hazily through a window (Jarred Alterman’s cinematography is consistently dreamy); yet Zanco’s romantically fuzzy aspect is fitting in a film that feels only tangentially concerned with corporate control of art.

“Everything happens for a reason,” a character says in “What/If,” but it’s not clear what the reason is behind this new Netflix drama, a peculiar mashup of producer Mike Kelley’s last series, “Revenge,” and an overt riff on the movie “Indecent Proposal.” Renee Zellweger headlines the cast, but her toothy role to move the show into the “Yes/Do” watch category.

The debt to “Revenge,” a twisty ABC series, is that one of the characters appears to be playing a very long game, which involves manipulating those around her. The difference is while the motivation for those events was explicitly stated by the title, the impetus here remains hazy, though not enough of a mystery to make the episodes much more than mildly watchable.
The centerpiece here is again a young woman, Lisa (“Suburgatory’s” Jane Levy), who is desperate to launch a medical-tech startup, but struggling to find financing. She eventually finds a backer in the form of Zellweger’s wealthy investor Anne Montgomery, but there’s a hitch: If you want my support, how about a night with your bartender husband, Sean (Blake Jenner)?
Newlyweds Sean and Lisa aren’t the only ones facing moral dilemmas, in a show that overflows with them. The tributary plots involve their friends and family, including Marcos (Juan Castano), who is somewhat dangerously drawing a third party into his relationship; and Angela (Samantha Ware), a married medical resident who is having an affair with her boss (Dave Annable), with all the complications that entails.
Unfortunately, most of those threads feel mostly like killing time until the focus gets back to Zellweger, who provides a lot of portentous advice like “You must be willing to make the hard choices, do the unpleasant things” and “True greatness only comes to those willing to pursue it at any cost.”
While there’s something fairly juicy about turning the “Indecent Proposal” gender dynamic on its head (the 1993 movie that presented Demi Moore and Woody Harrelson with that dilemma is referenced), Zellweger at times seems to have parachuted in from a different show — as if everyone else is doing a network soap, and she’s starring in a revival of “Basic Instinct.”
That aspect of the show should trigger curiosity — especially with Zellweger’s Judy Garland biopic coming up — and in pay-TV circles, that alone is something of a win. Still, whatever sizzle there is baked into the premise, in the execution, “What/If” feels a little too close to “So what?”

Halston Full Movie

Halston Full Movie : Halston Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And othersProdigiously talented, Halston reigned over fashion in the 1970s and  See full technical specs » Select any poster below to play the movie, totally free! From Iowa to Studio 54 to Wall Street, Halston an American dream.  May 21, 2019 | Full Review There are no approved quotes yet for this movie. Frédéric Tcheng’s latest film about the fashion designer includes ‘Halston’ Trailer: Liza Minnelli Jazzes Up Fashion Film From ‘Dior and I’

Sometimes a documentary doesn’t know when to leave well enough alone. It’s got access to all of the important people, who come through as their most maximal selves. It’s got a good story to tell and a life to unpack and tons of old photographs and miles of archival footage to delight, intrigue and astound. If you’ve got all of that and your documentary is called “Halston,” you don’t need anything else. And yet for reasons unfathomable to me, the people who made this movie don’t trust what they’ve got: the tale of one of the crucial fashion imaginations in Roy Halston Frowick, who went, titanically, by that middle name.

 

They don’t trust the images and interviews animating this thing. They feel compelled to be smart or maybe just ponderously playful about it. So Frédéric Tcheng’s movie opens the way a Raymond Chandler novel might, with an insinuation of noir, except “Halston” starts in some kind of editing room, in which video players are swallowing cassettes and the actor and writer Tavi Gevinson has to do a lot of lurking and creaking as both the narrator and, what, a production-assistant private detective? Somebody erased Halston’s precious video archive, and the movie wants to finger the culprit.

 

These early scenes are meant to conjure an air of 1980-something corporate ruthlessness and dour nostalgia (“It was morning again in America,” Gevinson says on two different occasions, from a script Tcheng wrote). But who cares about morning. Show me some evening gowns! “Halston” is a juicy business-culture story, not a film noir. It’s how about this ambitious, soap-opera handsome, emotionally opaque man went from Iowan to New Yorker, from serf at Bergdorf Goodman to Merlin of American fashion to shuttlecock in corporate-takeover badminton.

 

He made “hot pants” a thing in the 1960s and Ultrasuede shirt dresses a thing in the ’70s. His innovation of crafting dresses from a single piece of fabric — cutting along the bias — was basically a biblical miracle. (Women were completely naked under their Halstons. The man had, we’re told, “hands of gold.” And the patterns looked “like a Cuisinart blade.”) A Halston fashion show was a theatrical event that included, with aberrant nonchalance for the times, black models. Liza Minnelli was — and remains — a true-blue bestie. Both the designer and the brand became essential to ideas of attire in the ’70s and early ’80s. (The company made uniforms for the Girl Scouts, the folks at Avis, and the American athletes of the ’76 Olympics; he cut a deal to glamorize the average woman for J.C. Penney, making him a granddaddy of the mass-market fashion collaboration.)

 

Even through the Studio 54 era and the drug-assisted (or drug-induced) workaholism; even though, as the film rewinds to assert, Halston could be a tyrant, things were humming. But then big business — or rather really big business — entered in 1983 and had some concerns. The company’s new corporate parent, Esmark, scrutinized the budgets, and the exorbitant old days seemed doomed. The film details power struggles and ego trips and culture clashes. And the folks gathered here to do the enumerating — his assistants, his pals, one of his boyfriends, the models, the executives, his niece, a movingly protective Minnelli, the dude who erased the tapes — paint such a vivid picture of the atmosphere around Halston, the man and the industry, that you almost don’t mind that Halston himself remains elusive.

 

That’s partly a matter of his indirect participation (he died in 1990, at 57, of AIDS) and because he was as grand a fortress as his buddy Andy Warhol. He’s the mystery the film is trying to solve but can’t. All of that stuff with Gevinson, whose years as a young fashion blogger entitle her to do more here than Tcheng’s droning, seems amateurishly literal. And that’s strange for Tcheng, who’s directed or co-directed good fashion films, about Diana Vreeland and Christian Dior. He’s reaching here.

 

And yet I liked the deluge of visual information and personalities. The pictures, footage, biography, news and gossip are the opposite of a Halston dress — unruly, busy, fussed over. But they come at you with an energy that feels substantial. Knowing what to do with all of that material is its own kind of intelligence. Why overthink it? Or: why show us what you’ve overthought?

Booksmart Full Movie

Booksmart Full Movie :Booksmart Full Movie 2019, HD Quality and Really Easy for Watching on Your Desktop, PC, Mobile, iPhone, iPad, Mac, And othersA high-school movie is done right when the moments and characters in the story are so authentic and genuine that the young people watching feel as if their lives were somehow put on film.

Sometimes your bedrock assumptions about the world and your place in it suddenly collapse, a kind of existential earthquake that makes you rethink everything. For Molly, a Los Angeles teenager, that happens on the last day of senior year, in the school bathroom.

It’s no exaggeration — and not really much of a judgment — to say that Molly (Beanie Feldstein) thinks she’s better than everyone else, with the crucial exception of her best friend, Amy (Kaitlyn Dever). Valedictorian and student body president, on her way to Yale and then, she’s certain, to a seat on the Supreme Court, Molly has played the meritocratic game to win. Her morning meditation instructs her to “dominate the day,” and while her peers have been goofing off and hanging out, she and Amy have been hitting the books and building their résumés.

Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever in Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut, “Booksmart.”
Credit
Annapurna Pictures

Image
Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever in Olivia Wilde’s directorial debut, “Booksmart.”CreditAnnapurna Pictures
It’s thus uniquely humiliating when Molly learns, in the bathroom, that a bunch of kids she’s taken for losers — stoners, skaters, sexpots, slackers — are also going to top schools. If everyone’s a winner, Molly’s whole identity is a sham.

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This revelation sets off the festival of furious, belated YOLO-ing that drives most of “Booksmart,” a fast, brainy, nasty-but-nice teenage comedy directed by Olivia Wilde. Molly and Amy, who is about to leave for a summer do-gooding program in Botswana before matriculating at Columbia, have one night left to cut loose, and the movie rides in their wake as they bounce through Los Angeles in search of the party that will be wild enough to make up for all the time they’ve wasted playing by the rules.

The rules of this particular genre are clear enough. If you’ve seen “Dazed and Confused” or “Superbad” you’ll recognize the mood of aggressive silliness and sincere sentiment that hovers over Molly and Amy’s adventures. Wilde and the screenwriters (Katie Silberman, Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins and Susanna Fogel) don’t so much reinvent the formula as refresh it, infusing some familiar situations with an exuberant, generous, matter-of-factly feminist sensibility.

“Booksmart” is sharp but not mean, warm without feeling too soft or timid. The social stereotypes that have been a staple of the American high school experience as imagined in movies and TV shows going back to John Hughes — or “Happy Days,” or Dobie Gillis — are still intact, but they function as myths to be debunked rather than truths to be upheld.

The one dumb thing that Molly ever did was to judge her peers according to categories and appearances, and “Booksmart” gently teaches her a lesson by giving everyone else the same privileges she claims for herself and foists on Amy: to play against type; to be surprising; to change.

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Feldstein, a wonder in Greta Gerwig’s “Ladybird” as the titular character’s best friend, forges an instantly classic comic bond with the birdlike Dever. Molly and Amy are heirs of Lucy and Ethel, Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton, Abbi and Ilana. Their friendship is the crucial and absolute fact in the movie, though of course it will be tested as the night spins onward.

Amy’s well-meaning parents (Lisa Kudrow and Will Forte) have long assumed that Molly is her girlfriend. (Their daughter came out in the 10th grade, and they’re determined to be supportive, even if they’re still a little freaked out.) But the “something special” the two girls share lies “deeper than the deeps of sex,” as D.H. Lawrence said of a different classic friendship. They both have crushes — Victoria Ruesga and Mason Gooding play the objects of their infatuation — but sex and romance are side pursuits, subplots to the main love story.

And also, along with drugs and popular music, occasions for Wilde, in her directing debut, to demonstrate a nimble and inventive comic style. The rapid-fire, note-perfect dialogue is punctuated with moments of brilliant conceptual whimsy: animated and underwater sequences; horror-movie jump scares; immersive theater.

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